#WordOfTheDay – Learn what canorous means

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Hello Sparkle Writers! We are back with another word for you to learn. Ever heard of canorous before? We stumbled on it on Oxford’s weird word list and we are still not sure why they consider it a weird word. 

Canorous /kəˈnɔːrəs/ is an adjective that can be used to describe a song or speech as melodious or resonant. For example:

Nightingales are canorous birds.

Belting out a canorous tune, the singer’s beautiful voice seemed to entrance everyone around.

Giving a canorous speech to the attentive crowd, the speaker’s voice carried beautifully throughout the arena.

Here are a few words that are similar in meaning to canorous: melodious, pleasant, harmonious, clear, soft.

Now make your own sentences with this word. 

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#WordOfTheDay – Meander is not a difficult word

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Hey Sparkle Writers, we are super excited to bring a new word to you this Wednesday. Before we continue, what did you do with last week’s word? Use it in a sentence if you haven’t done so already. 

Today’s word is meander. Wondering why we say it is not a difficult word? It’s because you have used its synonyms so many times. We just want you to get familiar with it too. 

Meander is pronounced /mɪˈandə/.

It could be used to describe a river or road following a winding course – zigzagwindtwistturncurvecurl. 

Meander could also mean to wander aimlessly or casually without urgent destination. In this case roam or ramble would be perfect synonyms. ‘

Here are a few examples;

My dog meanders round the street every night. 

The trail meanders through towering evergreens, over a river and beside a fountain. 

#WordOfTheDay – Know what maniacal means

Medieval (1)

Good Morning Sparkle Writers!

We are learning a new word today. Who has heard of maniacal before? Probably not a lot of people.

Pronounced as /məˈnʌɪək(ə)l/, maniacal is an adjective that means to be affected with or suggestive of madness. If you describe a person or something as maniacal then he or she is probably exhibiting extremely wild or violent behaviour.

  • a maniacal dictator
  • maniacal laughter
  • maniacal energy
  • maniacal killer

Maniacal can also mean to be characterized by ungovernable excitement or frenzy 

For example,

The mob was maniacal, we almost called the show off

Jay’s fans go maniacal when they see him! 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what Senectitude means

Medieval (2)

Hey Sparkle Writers, our word for today is pretty simple – ‘Senectitude’.

The word looks really serious but it is not as serious as it looks.

First, it is pronounced this way [si-NEK-ti-tood]. It sure does sound nice, doesn’t it?

It is a noun meaning old age (We told you it was not that serious).

The origin of the word is from the Latin word ‘senectus’ meaning old.

Examples:

Senectitude comes with its own fair share of problems.

It is high time people embraced the reality of senectitude.

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what malign means

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We see that more people are checking out the WordOfTheDay series! Nice.

Our word for today is ‘malign.’ Who has heard it before? It’s a pretty simple word and is pronounced as /muh-lahyn/.

Malign is both a verb and an adjective. As a verb, it means to speak evil of someone or to defame someone while as an adjective, it means having or showing an evil disposition. 

Here are examples of this word in sentences;

It is wrong for that editor to malign an honorable man.

No one would have thought that the president was a part of that malign conspiracy.

Is there a word you want us to talk about? Drop it in the comment section.

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Learn what Timbuktu means

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Our word for today is a weird word. You might actually be tempted to think that such a word is not in the dictionary but it exists. That’s the beauty of the #WordOfTheDay segment.

The word is “Timbuktu” and it is pronounced as /tim-buk-TOO/

It is a noun that simply means a remote place. However, the name originated from the name of a town in central Mali, West Africa.

Examples:

The restaurant was located in Timbuktu.

She was so exhausted that she parked her car in Timbuktu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – This is what cocksure means

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Hey Sparkle Writers! 
Our word for today is “cocksure.” It is pronounced as /KOK-shoor/.
It is an adjective used to describe someone who is arrogantly or presumptuously overconfident.
The origin of the word is cock (a euphemism for god) + sure, from Old French seur, from Latin securus (secure). Earliest documented use was in 1520. Yeah its that old. 
Examples:
I thought myself cocksure of the horse which he readily promised me. 

I do not like Mr Shawn he seems preety cocksure 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Lagniappe is a such an easy word

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Hello Sparkle Writers, it’s Wednesday! Today’s word is one of the easiest word to pronounce but for some reason it looks really complex especially if you are just hearing it for the first time. See why you need to keep following our word of the day posts? There’s always something new to add to your vocabulary.

Lagniappe is pronounced  /lăn′yəp, lăn-yăp′/.

It means a small gift given to a customer by a merchant at the time of a purchase. Broadly, it is something given or obtained gratuitously or by way of good measure.

Let’s look at some examples. 

  • The waiter added a cup of lobster bisque as a lagniappe to the meal.
  • As a loyal customer I requested for a lagniappe when I visited during Christmas.

#WordOfTheDay – You may not know this but Ensconce is a word

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There are some words we see and we are sure we could not have imagined they were real. Ensconce is one of those words. What’s more surprising is its meaning. This is the reason for the #WordOfTheDay segment. To keep improving our vocabulary. 

Ensconce is pronounced /ɪnˈskɒns,ɛnˈskɒns/

It has two widely known meanings. The first is to place or hide securely . It also means to establish or settle firmly in a safe place. 

Here are a few words that could mean the same thing with ensconce. 

Settleinstallestablishparkshutplantlodgepositionseatentrenchshelternestle, curl up, snuggle up; 

Let’s use this word in some examples . 

My grandfather is ensconced in the armchair and waiting for the first grandchild to arrive.

Clara is comfortably ensconced in a beach chair and has no immediate plans to return to work.

Ensconced on the mantle, the kitten refused to jump into my arms.

 

 

#WordOfTheDay – Uberty means…

Medieval (1)

It is indeed fascinating how that the deletion of a particular letter from a word can change the entire meaning of the word forever. If you delete the letter ‘p’ from the word ‘puberty,’ you are going to get the word ‘uberty’ which is our word for today. And the meaning of ‘uberty’ is not even remotely related to the word ‘puberty.’

Uberty is a noun pronounced as /ju:b∂ti/. It is used to mean abundance or fruitfulness. It originated from the Latin word uber (rich, fruitful, abundant).

Here is how it is used in a sentence.

“Uberty comes from uncompromising strife or drive to achieve superior outcomes for the relationships.”